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FEATURE | EMBROIDERED DENIM JACKET DIY

Not one, not two, but three of my projects can be found in the special Mollie Makes edition: Mollie Makes Embroidery!!!

As you probably already know, I have collaborated with the always creative Mollie Makes on a lot of fun projects. And even though we have worked on an embroidery project before, (which can also be found in this special edition!) this time we embraced the colourful embroidery theme and went all out with an Embroidered Denim Jacket DIY.
The project was so much fun to do and even though embroidery projects are always time consuming, this one was so much fun, time just flew by!

Are you ready to be a ‘Boss’ and rock this special denim jacket? It’s easy! Get yourself the amazing Mollie Makes Embroidery Issue and start crafting away with 149 inspiring ideas and tutorials.

DIY | Clay Initial Bracelet

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

What do you get when it’s too cold outside, cats that want to cuddle 24-7 and you are in between projects? Yes: many new creative adventures!

These adventures include:
– A new jewelry collection
– A Lana Red Studio webshop!!!
– A tutorial of one of the jewelry pieces, because you can DIY-it or BUY-it ;)
– A brand new stop-motion DIY video of said bracelet (because why not!)

That is right, I just finished making a whole bunch of jewelry pieces and besides offering them in my Etsy shop you can also purchase them in my own webshop!
shop.lanaredstudio.com is officially live and I am offering items that you might recognise from the blog.

I encourage everyone to be creative, so you can also find the tutorials to make the pieces yourself on the LRS blog, but for those of you lacking the supplies or energy can buy the handmade items online today.

DIY-it or BUY-it is a concept that I just love. A unique style is in all of us and I am a big believer of having options and doing what feels right. Choose your way to go:

Scroll down to learn how to make your own Initial Bracelet

or

Visit the LRS Shop to order your own Initial Bracelet today


INITIAL BRACELET PROJECT

And now onto the bracelet project (since that is the reason for your visit to this page). Ever since I made my concrete jewelry and opened up my Etsy shop, I really enjoyed making jewelry. And while experimenting with new materials and textures I started to use polymer clay for the first time since I was 8.
Polymer clay comes in so many pretty colours and tones, that I instantly fell in love with the idea of turning something that is known to be a ‘kids crafting supply’ into fancy looking jewelry.

The results are great and after making earrings (which I combined with gold leaf) I used my left-over clay to make this initial bracelet, knowing that it is just one of those pieces that can go with anything and anyone, would be the perfect personal gift and is easy to make!

After giving one to my sister for her birthday (with a rose-gold chain) and making one for myself, it was time to share it with you!

This clay project is really easy, inexpensive and the fun part is that you can also adjust it to your own taste: use a different color chain, different color clay or even change the circle shape into something else (like a heart or star shape); the possibilities are endless.

Polymer Clay Bracelet DIY:


STOP-MOTION
VIDEO TUTORIAL


STEP-BY-STEP
PHOTO TUTORIAL

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

SUPPLIES

– Polymer Clay (I used Cernit with a granite look, but any kind will work for this project)
– Circle Mold (I used the lid of a marker. Anything will work, just as long as you can reach the circle from both sides to be able to remove the clay)
– Silver Chain
– 4 Hoop Rings
– Jewelry Clasp
– Toothpick ( or something similar to engrave the letter)

– Oven

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 1

– Take a piece of your clay and roll it around in your hand* until you have made a small ball.

* Depending on the brand that you use, the clay can be a bit too hard to knead and mold. If this is the case, you can use a hairdryer to slightly warm the clap up and make it more flexible – Use the lowest setting on your hairdryer and check the clay every few seconds.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 2

– Use a rolling pin, glass or something similar and press it on top of the clay ball.
– Press and roll until you have reached your desired thickness.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 3

– Place the mold of your choosing into the clay.
– Twist the mold around to separate the excess clay from your disc.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 4

– Remove the clay from your mold, revealing a small disc shaped piece of clay.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 5

– Use your toothpick to make two small holes* in your clay disc.

* Depending on the size of your disc and hoop rings, you can make the holes as big or as small as you like.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 6

– Choose your letter and start carving it into the clay. Start at the top and first mark the letter with small dots into the clay.
– Once you have ‘dotted’ the entire letter, follow the dotted line by pressing the toothpick into the clay and combining the dots into a line until you have carved the entire letter.

BAKING

– Once you are satisfied with the look of your charm, it is time to bake it.
– Bake the clay according to the instructions on the packaging in a preheated oven.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 7

While the clay is in the oven, let’s start working on the bracelet!

– Place the chain on you wrist and measure the length.
– Once you have decided the length of your bracelet, measure the clay charm and jewelry clasp.
– Subtract these measurements from you bracelet length and cut the chain bracelet in the correct size with your pliers.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 8

– Cut the bracelet chain in half with your pliers and place them on a flat surface as shown above.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 9

– Place the baked charm in between the two chain pieces.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 10

– Use a hoop ring to attach the right chain to the right hole in the clay.
– Repeat this for the left side.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 11

– Use a hoop ring to attach the clasp to the end of the right chain.

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

STEP 12

– Attach the last hoop ring to the left side of the bracelet.

All done! Your personalised clay bracelet is finished and ready to be worn!


DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet    DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet DIY | Polymer Clay Initial BraceletDIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

DIY | Polymer Clay Initial Bracelet

 

FEATURE | Ruffle Socks

FEATURE | Ruffle Socks

To quote the headline that appears next to my project in this months Mollie Makes magazine feature: “Channel your inner Sandra Dee with these gingham-trimmed socks!”

This month I collaborated with the always festive Mollie Makes on this fun sewing hack DIY project: ruffle socks.
It’s one of those projects that works in so many ways: it’s easy (even beginner sewers can do this!) it’s quick, and not to mention that you can make your own sock collection in different colours and styles for every day of the week!

Rock the ruffles above the edge of a booth or dare to go bold and wear them in a cute pair of clogs or heels.

Are you getting the sewing vibes and can’t wait to make your own pair of ruffle socks? It’s easy! Get yourself the latest Mollie Makes Issue and start crafting away with the tutorial.

FEATURE | Ruffle Socks

HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde

HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde

Surprise!! I am officially a blonde again! And what a journey it was!

Most of you know me as Lana Red, with red hair. But for those of you that have been with me since the beginning might remember that I used to be a blonde. I actually gave myself the alter ago Lana Red, because I always wear red lipstick.
Four years ago I dyed my hair red, because I have always wanted to see what it would look like. I was so happy and loved my hair! I actually still liked my red hair, but it was time for a change for several reasons:
– I am one of those people that moves the furniture around every 6 months to mix things up, and I am the same way with my wardrobe and hair. It felt like it was time for something new.
– Dyed red hair is one of the most difficult colours to keep up with. It fades really fast and since I wear extensions, I had to dye it every 3-4 weeks. This costs money and takes time.
– My hair was very unhealthy because of the constant dyeing to keep the color even, I couldn’t just do my roots, I had to dye all of my hair every month. I tried henna for a while, but after a few months it started to turn less red and more brown, forcing me to start using chemical dye again..

Here we are four years and a few very scary weeks of transforming into a blonde later! Since I see myself as a DIY person (aka stubborn and cheap;) I wanted to do the whole process myself. Unlucky for me because it was very scary and stressful, but lucky for you, because you can learn from my mistakes and stubbornness!


And as many of these extreme hair projects go, I can’t write this without a disclaimer. At first I wanted to write this as a DIY project, but since everyone has very different hair, I really can’t guarantee the same results. This is the story of how I turned my red hair into blonde at home and hopefully it is educational for those that are trying to do the same.


MY STORY

Please read the entire blogpost before you start to use any of the products or treatments that I recommend! Some things worked and others failed, so please don’t repeat my mistakes.

HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde

PRODUCTS

Colour B4
This product is very non-damaging for you hair and will remove a big chunk of the red from your hair. It won’t make your hair lighter, but it will remove a lot of the added hair dye.
Manic Panic Volume 40 Bleach Kit
This bleach is amazing. I mean it’s still bleach (meaning damaging to your hair) but is extremely effective for difficult colours like red hair dye. It also comes in volume 30 if you want to go less extreme.
Syoss Light Ash Blonde
Since I wanted to get rid of the brassy/red tones I added an ash blonde color over my bleached hair. I am not very familiar with brands, but this color and tone was closest to what I was looking for.

HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde

PROCESS

Removing the red hairdye

Before I started the whole scary bleaching process I tried to remove as much red from my hair as possible. For this stage I used Colour B4. It is a product that is very mild on your hair and it will remove as much hair dye that you have applied to your hair over the years as possible. I was amazed by the result after using it on my very processed hair! My hair went from a bold red tone to a brassy brown color.

You can use this product 3 times to de-colour your hair. I used it twice and it felt like that was enough for me.
Since my hair is very thin, I managed to use one pack of colour B4 for 2 treatments. But I recommend using one pack for each de-colouring.

Bleaching

After using colour B4, I waited a few days before I started the bleaching process.
For the bleaching I used Manic Panic Volume 40. This is a very strong, but effective bleach. Since my hair is very thin and frail, bleaching truly scares me. I am always afraid of my hair breaking off and having to shave all of my hair off. Which is why I tested bleaching my hair a while ago when I dyed a blonde streak in my hair. This is when I used manic panic for the first time and it worked really well!

My hair did get damaged and I learned that I had to cut it at least 5 cm after I had bleached it to keep it looking healthy. So I suggest that you also mix a little bit of the bleaching product and try it on a small strand of hair before you do all of it.

I bleached my hair twice, 20 minutes each time. After the first time it was still very orange. The second time, it took a lot better and it went from orange to brassy/blonde.
Now, I should have waited some time (weeks) before bleaching it again after the first time, but the vain person in me just really didn’t want to walk around with bright orange hair for weeks. So I waited a few days, was generous with my conditioner and bleached it again.

Rest and toning

It’s no surprise that my hair was damaged by the bleaching process. My hair was still not completely blonde, but it was as light as I wanted it. The only thing left for me to do now was to remove the brass coloured streaks that had appeared in my hair. After googling, I had learned that applying an ash coloured hair dye wouldn’t do the trick in this stage yet, because the streaks were too brassy and had to be more yellow before an ash colour would take. So for a few weeks I gave my hair “silver shampoo masks”. This means that twice a week I would apply a generous amount of silver shampoo on my hair and leave it in for 20-30 minutes, slowly removing the brassy tones.
I had to be careful with parts of my hair that didn’t have a red shade, because they could turn grey, so I didn’t apply the silver shampoo on my roots to prevent them from going grey.
I also treated my hair very gently these weeks, no brushing it when it was wet, trying not to wash it too often and always using conditioner. This is also the time when I cut my hair to remove the split ends.

Adding color

After a few weeks, I had managed to remove most of the brassy tones with the silver shampoo method. At this point I think my hair had 4 different shades of blonde, ranging from strawberry (the bottom of my hair) to platinum (my roots). Obviously not ideal and when it is wet it looks even worse. But I have to say that I was still very happy with how quickly my hair adapted to it’s new color.
In an attempt to even the different shades of blonde out, I dyed it with an ash blonde hair dye. This worked pretty well, the platinum on my roots turned less white and everything started to match more.

The strawberry blonde parts didn’t go away though, and I still have a few brassy streaks, but I can definitely live with those for now until my hair has had some rest.


ADDING LENGTH 

Since bleaching is so damaging to my (and I guess everyones) hair, it almost always involves sacrificing a few centimeters of your ends, leaving you with shorter hair. And for those of us that have the slowest growing hair, it is the worst. My hair has never been able to grow much past shoulder length, because it is so thin and frail and it also grows very slow, it always has. So a few years ago I embraced the girly girl in me and I decided to try out clip-in hair extensions. And wow, the effect was amazing! I had been dreaming of having long wavy hair ever since I was a little girl (I actually started wearing a blonde wig when I was 5 years old).

There seems to be this big taboo around wearing extensions, but to me it is a dream come true. Every time someone compliments me about my hair, I excitedly start telling them that even my hair is a ‘DIY project’!

So one of the first things that I did when deciding to go blonde was to look for the best way and place to replace my red extensions. I found an amazing company called Cliphair and we decided to collaborate for my big hair project!

The reason why I wanted to work with Cliphair is because they offer something that I haven’t found anywhere else yet: a DIY set. Normally you can buy ready made clip-in extension which work for a lot of people, but my head is pretty small and they never really fit that great. So I would always have to buy a piece of hair weave, separate clips and calculate how much hair I would be needing for my tiny head.
With this DIY set you receive a generous amount of hair weave and clips in one package. You can measure your head and sew the clips in the weave according to your hairstyle.

HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde

I usually make my extensions with a double layer and attach the clips to both layers. You can go to my hair extension DIY project to learn how to make your own hairextensions.

HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde

After I have sewn the clips to the extensions, I put them in my hair and decide the length of the hair. I usually go for three pieces/strokes of extensions and cut them all in different lengths. The bottom one the longest and the top one the shortest to make the transition from my own hair as less visible as possible.

HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde

You can also color the extensions to match them more to your own hair and try different hairstyles to mix it up!
I usually wear my hair in a half ponytail, but I have been experimenting with different hairstyles lately, so get ready for a new hair tutorial soon!!

NEXT UP

So my hair is (sort of) blonde, what is the next step?
Since there are still a few brassy streaks in my hair, I think that I will continue using the silver shampoo for a while and see how that goes.
The biggest decision now is what I should do with my roots. Color them, grow them out or ‘tone’ them? I haven’t decided on that yet. Do you, me dear friends, have any experience with this?

But for now, getting used to my new look is my main goal. (oh, and having to take a lot of photos to update my red hair pics;)

HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde HAIR PROJECT | How I Went From Red to Blonde

Do you have a similar story? Questions? Or do you have any advice for me and other fellow hair experimenters? Please let me know in the comment section or shoot me an email!

I would love to know if my story was helpful or if you have an extreme hair story that might educate others!

 

FEATURE | Scalloped Collar Bib

FEATURE | Scalloped Collar BibGet ready for warmer weather with this cute Scalloped Collar Bib project in this months Mollie Makes magazine! My favourite crafty magazine and I collaborated on this original project and I am so happy with how it turned out!

I am a big fan of wearing blouses and it is definitely my go-to piece for the rare occasions that I wear pants instead of dresses ;) A bib is a perfect piece for you, my fellow blouse lovers. It is practical, cute and goes with anything!
For this months Mollie Makes I made a sewing project, showing you how to make your own bib with a limited amount of sewing patterns. Combine this sewing project with a cute fabric, add a scalloped neckline (also included in the DIY) and you are ready for spring!

Are you getting the sewing vibes and can’t wait to make your own bib? It’s easy! Get yourself the latest Mollie Makes Issue and start crafting away with the tutorial.

FEATURE | Scalloped Collar Bib

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper ClutchAre you also always starting many new projects and have a ton of leftover pieces of fabric that are too small to turn into something wearable, but too pretty to throw away? Well, do I have a great solution for! Turn them into a patchwork clutch!

And no, by patchwork I don’t mean a granny style purse, but an on-trend geometric zipper clutch that is both practical and pretty.

I have made a bunch of these in a variety of fabrics and they always turn out wonderful. You might recognise the fabrics from my Mollie Makes projects or my latest collaboration with Spoonflower. The combinations are endless and you just simply can’t go wrong here.

DIY


This project is a part of the LRS DIY it / BUY it collection.
Make it yourself, or buy it today!


 

SUPPLIES

– 3 pieces of scrap fabric
– Lining fabric
– Zipper
– Piece of paper
– Ruler or measuring tape
– Scissors
– Pins
– Sewing Machine

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 1

– Take your piece of paper and place your zipper at the top. Cut the paper in the same width as the zipper.

– Decide the length of your clutch and add 1 cm at the top and 1 cm the bottom of that size.

– Cut the piece of paper.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 2

– Draw 2 lines within your clutch template to create the patchwork look.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 3

– Cut the patchwork pieces out of the paper. Mark the individual pieces to remember where each goes.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 4

– Place the patchwork template pieces on your pieces of scrap fabric and cut them out.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 5

– Sew two of the fabric pieces together. And fold the crease at the back open.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 6

– Attach the last piece of fabric to the rest and fold the back crease open.

– Repeat step 3 to 6 for the back of the clutch.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 7

– Place your patchwork piece on top of the lining and cut the shape out twice.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 8

– Place your zipper along the length of the patchwork piece of fabric. with right sides together.

– Position a piece of lining fabric on top of the zipper with the right side facing down and raw edges aligned.

– Pin and sew along the top of the zipper.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 9

– Fold your layers open so the patchwork fabric and zipper are right sides up, with the lining fabric layered underneath.

– Top stitch along the seam, close to the edge of the zipper.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 10

– Repeat step 8 and 9, with the remaining pieces of fabric.

– Open the zipper

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 11

– Pin both the patchwork pieces and the lining pieces right sides together.

– Sew around all four edges leaving a small opening in the bottom of the lining.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

STEP 12

– Turn the clutch right sides out through the opening in the lining.

– Sew the opening in the lining shut with a straight stitch along the seam.

– Push the lining neatly inside the clutch.

 

* Styling tip: attach a ribbon to the zipper for a finished look

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

Once you have made your template in steps 1 to 3, you can make as many clutches as you want in a variety of styles.

Mix and match different types of scrap fabric and make your own clutch collection! They make great gifts!


 

Or.. if you are not feeling crafty, don’t have a pile of fabric scraps that are suitable for this project or you just like the one that I made?
No worries! You can actually also purchase one (or 2 or 3..) in my Etsy shop! Get your brand new handmade clutch today!

DIY it, BUY it, it is up to you.

SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper ClutchSEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch SEWING DIY | Geometric Fabric Scrap Zipper Clutch

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern

Today I am sharing my collaboration with the amazing Spoonflower with you! I designed my own fabrics and used them for this robe coat project. I documented every step of the way, to make sure that you can also do this project at home and design your own fabric and make your own coat!

Let’s start at the beginning: Spoonflower, which is an awesome digital printing company that prints custom fabric, wallpaper, and gift wrap, opened a new location right around the corner from my house. I already was a big fan of their work, and grabbed the opportunity to stop by and take a look at what they do. And after seeing the entire process of how a design get’s printed onto their pretty fabrics and meeting the lovely people behind the scenes of such a creative company, I was thrilled to start my own project and share it with you!

The project

I have always wanted to make my own (winter) coat, since every year I struggle with finding the right colourful long coat for my figure (I am sure that I am not alone in this). Spoonflower has a very pretty faux suede fabric and it inspired me to use that for this coat project.

For the design, I went to my favourite inspirational source: the website of the Dutch Rijksmuseum. This museum offers a great archive of beautiful paintings and lets you download and use them for free (see also my temporary tattoo project).
I combined 4 paintings and redesigned them into a new print for the outside of the coat.
For the lining I used another part of a painting and turned it into a ‘falling leaves’ print.

SEWING-DIY-_-How-to-Make-a-Robe-Coat-in-30-Steps-Without-a-Sewing-Pattern

The timing for this print was perfect, because around the time that I was designing the print, Pantone released their new color of the year: Greenery. How on-trend am I?;)

For you

It wouldn’t be much fun to design and make all of this if I couldn’t share it with you. So this is a very detailed (30 steps to be exact) DIY project to make sure that you can also create this coat yourself!

– No sewing pattern needed, I made this coat project without a sewing pattern!
– You can design your own fabric for this project, or use the print that I designed.
– Don’t need a new coat? You can also simplify this project and use it to make a robe! Just skip the interfacing and lining parts and choose a pretty fabric that works for your new robe.

Are you ready to design and make your own coat? I suggest that you read the full step-by-step below before you start. There are 30 detailed steps to guide you through the process of making a no-pattern coat! And if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to leave them in the comment section below.

DIY:


MATERIALS

– 4 meters of Faux Suede fabric – Click here to order the fabric used in this project
– 4 meters of Satin lining fabric – Click here to order the fabric used in this project
– 4 meters of Interfacing
– Snap Buttons x2
– Pins
– Scissors
– Sewing machine

– 1 Dress or coat for the basic shape of the coat
– 1 Coat to trace the sleeves

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 1

STEP 1

– Place the fabric for the coat on a flat surface. Take a non-stretch dress or coat* in your size and place it flat and widespread onto the fabric. (it doesn’t need to have the length, that can be added later.

– Fold the arms of the dress/coat to the inside, to reveal the shoulder seam of the arm.

** The dress or coat should be a non-stretch a-line model with a high neckline at the back (the front neckline doesn’t matter), preferably slightly too large and definitely not too tight.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 2

STEP 2

– Decide the length of the coat and use pins to follow the side seam lines until you have reached your chosen length.

– Cut the fabric along the shape of the dress/coat, adding about 3cm around the sides and the top, and the added pinned line at the bottom. (this is 2 extra cm to give room for the padding and 1 cm for the seam allowance)

– Cut this shape again for the front.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 3

STEP 3

– Fold one of the pieces that you made in step 2 horizontally double.

– Cut the folded line open with your scissors to create the front opening of the coat.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 4

STEP 4

The back piece already has a neckline, but now we have to create the neckline of the 2 front pieces.

– To create a robe/like neckline, improvise by starting to cut a v-shape line from the shoulder seam downwards for about 30 cm. Making sure that the transition to the rest of the front is smooth(see the above photo)

– Repeat this for the other front piece.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 5

STEP 5

– Fold a piece of the faux suede fabric double.

– Place the piece of clothing that you choose for the sleeve pattern onto the folded fabric, with the longest seam (the line towards the shoulder) on the fold of the fabric.

– Trace the line of the sleeve adding 3 cm all around. (this is 2 extra cm to give room for the padding and 1 cm for the seam allowance)

– Cut the fabric with your scissors.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 6

STEP 6

– For the front folded seams, cut out 4 long pieces of faux suede fabric that can cover the entire vertical front of the ‘front seam’ and approximately 12 cm wide each.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 7

STEP 7

– Place the interfacing on a flat surface and trace the: back piece, 2 front pieces and sleeves onto your interfacing fabric.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 8

STEP 8

– Place the lining fabric on a flat surface and trace the: back piece, 2 front pieces, sleeves and 2 of the long strokes onto your interfacing fabric.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 9

STEP 9

– Place the interfacing of the sleeve fabric on a flat surface.

– Place one suede sleeve pattern piece, right side up, on top of the interfacing.

– Fold the outer sides inwards and pin and sew together.

– Repeat this for the other sleeve and the lining sleeves.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 10

STEP 10

– Place the interfacing back piece on a flat surface with the faux suede back piece on top (right side up).

– Place the two faux suede front pieces on top of that (right sides down). And place the accompanying interfacing on top of that.

– Pin the sides and shoulders together.

– Pin the sleeve into the armholes and sew everything together.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 11

STEP 11

– Place the lining back piece on a flat surface (right side up).

– Place the two lining front pieces on top of that (right sides down).

– Pin the sides and shoulders together.

– Pin the sleeve into the armholes and sew everything together.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 12

STEP 12

– Turn the 4 strips of faux suede into 2 longer strokes by sewing them together.

– Repeat this for the interfacing.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 13

STEP 13

– Place the interfacing on top of one of the long strips of faux suede.

– Attach them to the entire front opening of the coat, starting at the bottom and going all around, pinning the right sides together.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 14

STEP 14

– Once you have pinned the entire front of the coat to the strip of suede and interfacing, sew the pinned layers together.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 15

STEP 15

– Place the second long strip of faux suede fabric, face down, on top of the strip that you have just sewn to the front of the coat (both right sides should face each other).

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 16

STEP 16

– Sew the pinned layers together and fold last added strip to towards the inside of the coat.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 17

STEP 17

– Pin and sew the folded part close to the egde to keep the fabric in place.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 18

STEP 18

Try the coat on and see how it fits. Right now it should fall loosely around your body, and the front opening should be able to fit across your stomach and hips.

– If you want the coat to have a more tailored look, you can use this step to make a few adjustments*, I decided to create a smaller waist and slightly tighter sleeves. Pin everything first, and try the coat on again to see how it fits and once you are happy with the look, sew the pinned lines and cut off any excess fabric.

** If the adjustments are minor, you can continue to the next step, if you decided to make the coat a lot smaller, make the same adjustments to your lining fabric before you continue.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 19

STEP 19

– Place the coat, right side up on a flat surface.

– Place your lining fabric, right side down, on top of the open coat.

– Try to match all of the seams together as possible and pin the front opening of the lining to the suede strip that you folded inwards in step 16 (right sides together)

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 20

STEP 20

– If you would like to have a loop to hang up your coat, this would be the step to add it.

– Cut a small piece of faux suede and fold it twice horizontally.

– Sew along the middle of the horizontal line.

– Pin the piece to the middle of the neckline between the lining and collar, having the loop stick out on the right sides of the fabric.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 21

STEP 21

– Once you have pinned the strip to the lining, try the coat on to see if there is any tension in the lining. If necessary make any adjustments and sew the pinned parts together.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 22

STEP 22

– Fold the coat right sides out.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 23

STEP 23

– Take the left sleeve and place it on a flat surface.

– Take the left sleeve of the lining fabric and place it on top of your faux suede sleeve, with the shoulder and side seems aligned.

– Cut the end of the lining sleeve slightly shorter (between 1cm and 2 cm) than the faux suede sleeve.

– Repeat this for the other side.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 24

STEP 24

– Fold the coat inside out with both fabrics right sides in.

– Place the coat on a flat surface and have the lining fabric on the left and the faux suede fabric on the right, with the sides of the coat in the middle and the sleeves out wide.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 25

STEP 25

– Take the left sleeve of the lining fabric and the left sleeve of the faux suede fabric and place the openings together.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 26

STEP 26

– Pin the openings of the arms together, creating a circle.

– Sew the pinned lines.

– Repeat this for the other sleeves.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 27

STEP 27

– Fold the coat with the lining on the outside to check if the inside of the sleeves are sewn together correctly.

– You can sew the end of the sleeve or leave it like this.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 28

STEP 28

– Fold the coat right side out.

– Open the front of the coat and use a seam ripper or scissors to open approx. 3 cm of the bottom front lining of the coat.

– Repeat this for the other bottom front opening.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 29

STEP 29

– Fold the lining and the faux suede bottom of the coat inwards and pin them together.

– Try the coat on to see if there is any tension in the lining of the fabric, or if the lining is too loose and is visible at the bottom of the coat. Make any changes if necessary and keep trying it on until it fits perfect.

– Sew the bottom of the coat with your sewing machine, or sew it by hand, to avoid a visible stitch on the outside of the coat.

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern 30

STEP 30

– Try the coat on and fold the front openings across the front of your body. Find the best fit and mark the points that would keep the openings in place like this with a pin or fabric marker.

– Attach 2 snap buttons to the marked parts with needle and thread.

And that is it! You are a star!

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern

I really love how the coat turned out and it is definitely warm enough for the Berlin winter!
And since this was a very special project I had the talented Matthias of  www.der-gottwald.de take the result photos!

SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing PatternSEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing PatternSEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing PatternSEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern SEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing PatternSEWING DIY | How to Make a Robe Coat in 30 Steps Without a Sewing Pattern


Credits

Fabrics by Spoonflower
Photography by www.der-gottwald.de

FEATURE | Paper Peonies & Concrete Vase

FEATURE | Paper Peonies & Concrete Vase

Not one, but two projects that I made for the creative Mollie Makes magazine can be found in this months magazine! This time they had the wonderful idea of combining two projects and let them show off each others features together.

Since concrete is still one of my current fav materials (see my concrete jewellery DIY), this project couldn’t have come at a better time! I made this cilinder shaped concrete vase DIY and combined it with a paper peonies tutorial. The paper peonies turned out exactly as I had hoped, thanks to a secret technique;)
I love how the delicate paper flowers go so well with the grey concrete vase.

Are you ready to start pouring concrete and find out about my secrete paper peony technique? It’s easy! Get yourself the latest Mollie Makes Issue and start crafting away with this tutorial.

FEATURE | Paper Peonies & Concrete Vase

RECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat’s Cheese Tart

RECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat's-Cheese Tart

What to do when you don’t like to cook, but still want to eat healthy and have it look tasty at the same time? Bake!

I have been searching for new recipes online and I could never find something that I really liked, probably because I am a pretty picky eater and vegetarian. Oh, and not to mention a lazy chef..
Which is why my solution to my aversion to cooking has been baking meals that are freezable and portion controlled. It is just perfect! I only have to cook/bake when my freezer feels empty and since it involves baking, most of the time goes into waiting for the oven anyway: perfect!

I have been experimenting with veggie burgers, burritos and these pastry tarts. They are all great dishes, that go really well combined with a soup or salad.
For these tarts I picked my favourite winter food for the basis: sweet potato. It goes with everything, is filling and is such an easy vegetable to work with. I also added baked cherry tomatoes. I am not a big tomato fan, but when they are baked it changes everything! (and I guess I wouldn’t mind them on top of a pizza;)

I came up with this recipe after trying out a few different versions. But please feel free to change any ingredient that you don’t like, or add things that you do like. It is suitable for vegetarians, and it is definitely possible to use light versions of the cream and goat’s cheese.
For the vegans among us: you can substitute the egg for almond milk, the cream cheese for soy yoghurt and the goat’s cheese for vegan goat’s cheese (there is a great recipe here). Enjoy!

RECIPE:


– Follow the photo recipe here, or scroll down to the bottom of this post to see the complete recipe –

INGREDIENTS – for 4 big tarts

1 medium sized sweet potato (approx. 500g)

125g Cherry tomatoes

75g Cream cheese or Sour Cream

4 defrosted Puff Pastry Sheets

75g Goat’s Cheese

1 Onion

1 egg, for glazing

1 Clove Garlic

2tbsp Olive Oil

2tsp Salt

This recipe if suitable for vegetarians. 

RECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat's-Cheese Tart

STEP 1

Preheat the oven to 225°C.
– Peel and cut the sweet potato in 3mm thick slices.
– Chop the onion and place it in an oven safe dish with the sweet potato slices.
– Add a tablespoon of olive oil and mix the onion and potato.
– Place the dish in the oven for 20-30 minutes. Stirring the ingredients after 10 minutes.

RECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat's-Cheese Tart

STEP 2

– Take the onion and sweet potato slices out of the oven after 20-30minutes. reduce the oven to 180°C.
– Chop the clove of garlic and toss it into an oven safe dish with the cherry tomatoes.
– Add a tablespoon of olive oil to the mixture.

RECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat's-Cheese Tart

STEP 3

– Place the defrosted puff pastry sheets onto a lined baking tray.
– Cover the pastries with the cream cheese (or sour cream), leaving approx. 1 cm free all around.

RECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat's-Cheese Tart

STEP 4

– Place the slices of sweet potato on top of the cream cheese.
– spread the onion over the sweet potato slices and top with the goat’s cheese.
– Beat the egg and brush it around the border of the pastry.

STEP 5

– Place the tray into the oven for 20-35 minutes.
– At the same time place the garlic and tomato mixture in the oven for the same duration. (they are baked separately to prevent the pastry from going ‘soggy’ in case the tomatoes burst in the oven)
– After 20-35 minutes take the tray and dish out of the oven and garnish the pastries with the garlic and tomatoes.

Serve warm or at room temperature.
They can be stored in the freezer and saved for later. (simply defrost them afterwards and heat them up in the oven on a low temperature)

RECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat's-Cheese Tart

 

RECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat's-Cheese TartRECIPE | Sweet Potato & Goat's-Cheese Tart

FULL RECIPE

Preheat the oven to 225°C.
– Peel and cut the sweet potato in 3mm thick slices.
– Chop the onion and place it in an oven safe dish with the sweet potato slices. Add a tablespoon of olive oil and mix the onion and potato.
– Place the dish in the oven for 20-30 minutes. Stirring the ingredients after 10 minutes.
– Take the onion and sweet potato slices out of the oven after 20-30minutes. reduce the oven to 180°C.
– Chop the clove of garlic and toss it into an oven safe dish with the cherry tomatoes. Add a tablespoon of olive oil to the mixture.
– Place the defrosted puff pastry sheets onto a lined baking tray.
– Cover the pastries with the cream cheese (or sour cream), leaving approx. 1 cm free all around. Place the slices of sweet potato on top of the cream cheese.
– spread the onion over the sweet potato slices and top with the goat’s cheese.
– Beat the egg and brush it around the border of the pastry.
– Place the tray into the oven for 20-35 minutes.
– At the same time place the garlic and tomato mixture in the oven for the same duration.
– After 20-35 minutes take the tray and dish out of the oven and garnish the pastries with the garlic and tomatoes.

Serve warm or at room temperature.
They can be stored in the freezer and saved for later. (simply defrost them afterwards and heat them up in the oven on a low temperature)

STYLE | How To Wear Heels In The City

STYLE | How To Wear Heels In The CitySo you are packing your suitcase for a fun city break, you pack your sunglasses, toiletries, favourite outfits, picture of your cat, etc. Until you have everything in order except the most challenging packing item of all: formal shoes.

Which brings me to todays very girly topic: How is anyone supposed to wear heels in the city?

And by city I mean every location that is a challenge to walk on in stilettos. This might sound like an extremely strange question, because the answer could simply be: just do not wear heels when you plan on going for a long walk or when you hit challenging sidewalks.
But.. did you ever see those photos on Pinterest of fashionable girls calling for a cab in New York City, looking flawless and wearing jaw dropping heels?
Well, I planned on being one of those girls when I first went to NYC. Until I realised that I can’t afford to take cabs everywhere, and that many buildings do not have elevators, etc. etc. There I was in my pretty Carrie Bradshaw dress and holding my pretty heels in my hand when changing into flats. While flats are my go-to shoe wear in the summer, I just could not except that the city pavement had beaten me. Making me challenge myself to find ‘heels’ that will work and make me happy when wearing them since my current home is also in a big-cobblestone-party-city (because that is the basic point to this hole story)

 


Here are the things that I have learned so far:

Wedges are your best cobblestone friends

STYLE | How To Wear Heels In The City 2

When working in Amsterdam a couple of years ago, I had to buy and return a lot of clothes at pricy stores, which made me want to look nice and I mainly wore high-heels. I had to cross the Dam square a lot every week and for those of you that haven’t been there: it is a big open space with the most annoying (very old and pretty, but annoying!) cobblestones that I have ever encountered. Within a week, the bottom of my soles were completely worn out and needed replacement. I went to a local shoe-repair store and asked if they had something that would make my soles last longer. They said no, and I asked if they had a suggestion on how to prevent it from happening, their answer? ” Walk around the Dam square”… Very funny guys those shoe-repair-men :)

Later, I came up with my own solution: wedged heels. They are perfect for it! I can walk on them for hours and they won’t get stuck between the cobblestones, hurray!
I even did a wedged heel restyle DIY project because I loved them so much!


Short boots with a chunky (block) heel.

STYLE | How To Wear Heels In The City

The last time that I visited New York City, I had learned from my previous mistakes and brought the best thing that I could think off: Short boots with a chunky heel. I got these as a present from my sister and they had a very comfortable insole, which made them perfect for the trip!
I actually walked on them on most of the days for hours and they made me feel stylish and comfy at the same time.

And what to do during the summer when boots are too warm? Simple:

STYLE | How To Wear Heels In The City 1

Go for an open sandal with a chunky heel! I wrote more about these beauties in a previous post.


Platforms for when you want to add length

STYLE | How To Wear Heels In The City

A chunky heel or wedges are perfectly fine and already an upgrade over sneakers under your stylish summer dress, but if you want to take it one step further and can’t avoid a thinner and higher heel, I suggest platforms.
They don’t have to be a ‘Spice Girl’ platform boot, but even a 2 cm platform sole will take 2 cm’s of the height of the heel for you. Making the shoes more comfortable, while adding length. (the shoes in the photo above have a ‘hidden’ raised platform sole)


For those special occasions where you can’t avoid going fancy

STYLE | How To Wear Heels In The City

Your wedding in the city, a friends wedding, an anniversary party, an invitation to the fanciest gala in the world, sometimes you just can’t avoid wearing ‘traditional’ pumps if you are a girly girl like me. My advice for those occasions: try to cheat!
For the photo above I borrowed a wedding dress and these gorgeous vintage Gucci shoes from the costume department where I was working. To me, they are the perfect example of playing with the ‘traditional’ pump rules and will go with a variety of outfits. They have a chunky-but-not-too-chunky heel and a good sized platform sole. I realised here that the color and details really made them what they are: one of a kind fancy heels!


Car, Taxi, Bike, a friends shoulders…

STYLE | How To Wear Heels In The City 1And if everything is still going wrong, and you just have to wear those unique and oh-so pretty high-heeled shoes. Just do what I usually do: take a bike! (or drive a car)
I save getting a cab or biking somewhere for what I call my: birthday- and cinema-shoes. Because those activities only require me to sit down and look pretty:)


Now that I have shared my story, what are your high-heeled experiences? Did you discover the magic trick that will save all of us heel-wearing girly girls?
Let me know in the comment section or shoot me an email!